TEFL TIPS #4 – Verb of the Day

Verbs are the skeleton of any language. Most ESL learners know the basics:. ‘eat,’ ‘go’, ‘play‘ etc., but expanding this list is vital to those working towards achieving a higher level of both spoken and written English.

verb of the day

In my classroom, I introduced a method I call ‘verb of the day’. It’s pretty simple but effective.

Every day I spend a few minutes introducing a new verb and ask my students to use that verb in a sentence. In a few weeks, my students progress from using standard verbs: ‘I eat‘ ‘I go’ & ‘I like‘ to the more advanced: ‘I climbed’, ‘I jump’, ‘I travelled‘.

The more creative you are at introducing the verb (you could use a song, dance and games), naturally the more the class will learn. For the smaller kids, acting out the words can be very effective.

A list of verbs I use to teach in kindergartens – elementary school are as followings:

– stretch
– push
– pull
– visit
– bend
– think
– cry
– rush
– throw
– move
-chase
– bite

The older or more advanced the students the further you can go:

– quit
– shake
– whisper
– scare

I find these Verb Flashcards from Amazon super helpful in my online and brick and mortar classroom:

TEFL TIPS #3 – Storybots

If you are lucky enough to have internet access in your classroom, you’d be stupid not to take advantage of it.

Storybots

Youtube is full of useful ESL videos that you can play to your class to assist with teaching. While relying heavily on videos may be a cop out, using them selectively can help create a more dynamic classroom environment.

A channel I cannot recommend enough is Storybots, found here:
https://www.youtube.com/user/storybots

(recently changed to Netflix Jr)

I primarily use it to show clips when I teach the alphabet as a little break in between activities—the kids love the animations. Each video utilizes a large variety of words that can help expand children’s vocabulary. The music in the Storybot videos is catchy and after listening to a certain one a few times, the class will try to sing along!

Storybots also has an assortment of other songs that can be used for many different things such as ‘clean up’, ‘teeth’ and numbers.

Why not try to spruce up your lessons? Check it out.

TEFL TIPS #6 – Increase your cash: Start Tutoring

So you’ve taken the leap and decided to teach abroad: you found a great job, set up your apartment, and found the means to keep yourself fed, washed, and comfortable. Like many TEFL teachers you’ll discover rent, food, and utilities always run a bit higher than you expected and you’re itching for some spending cash. If you truly enjoy teaching, private tutoring can be a fantastic way to supplement your income while gaining experience with a wider range of ages and ability levels. Tutoring jobs are generally easy to secure—a flyer on a telephone pole is often enough to get a few students, while in some areas you may be approached randomly on the street just for being a foreigner. However, it is essential to realize teaching and tutoring are very different things, so before you start filling up your schedule, keep in mind:

 Know the Purpose

Those seeking out tutors each have unique reasons and goals. Make sure you thoroughly understand what each student is looking for. A middle-aged family man planning to relocate abroad doesn’t need to know the difference between past progressive and past perfect tenses, nor will a high school student studying for college entrance exams be all that concerned with how to order food in a restaurant.

Take Advantage of the Flexibility 

Your first tutoring job will no doubt be challenging—a one-on-one session with no coursebook, no lesson plans, and no classroom is a daunting scenario. Your first session with a new student can certainly be used to get a better handle on their current ability level, but be prepared to provide your students with some sort of practice material or key phrases/vocabulary to practice. Don’t be afraid to assign homework or give short quizzes—they’re paying you to both support and challenge them. Use the freedom from structure to challenge yourself as well by testing your creativity—develop new activities or generate original material you can use in the future.

Know What You’re Worth

One of the most awkward things TEFL teachers need to learn to do is set their tutoring fee—having some idea of what to charge is important to know before you get caught off guard by the question. In countries like Korea where English education is a huge industry and cost of living is high, tutoring fees generally start around 40,000 Won / hour (roughly $33), while in countries like Cambodia where cost of living is lower and English is already widely spoken, one can expect to make only about $10 / hour. In other countries it can vary greatly from city to city and grade to grade—and payment doesn’t necessarily need to be in cash. In more rural areas I’ve been paid in honey, oranges, kale, and whiskey. One generous woman even paid me with a live chicken intended for dinner—I’d like to believe she’s still living a full life clucking around in the hills of Thailand.

Tutoring may not be for everyone, but it’s definitely an easy way to make ends meet in a pinch or gain some spending money for those long weekends.

-Ashley

TEFL TIPS #5 – Asking the right questions.

An important goal of TEFL teaching is to keep students talking, getting them to practice new words and reinforce those they’ve learned. A simple tactic for doing this is asking questions about what they have, whether it be a drawing, a book, or a toy. However many teachers, myself included, often fall into a rut of asking the same questions over and over long after their kids have outgrown them merely because it often seems there are only so many ways for a kid to describe something. Chief among such questions are “What color is it?” “How many are there?” “Is it big or little?”

As teachers, we have to move away from this routine. It’s boring, it’s repetitive, and it doesn’t challenge the kids to think creatively or use their English in new ways. It is important to remember that asking questions isn’t only intended to test their vocabulary, but also to help them think outside the box. Here are some more challenging description methods you can try with your students:

Give it personality: What is its name?
This can easily be asked of toys and drawings, and of everyday objects as well. Oftentimes when I start using this question they’ll simply tell me what something is (“Me draw bunny!”). But simply telling me that a drawing of a bunny is a bunny isn’t enough—by getting them to name that bunny, it often sparks a whole new conversation (“Bunny name is Zombie. Zombie is silly monster; Zombie eats shoes”). Names are associated with personalities and individuality—a concept not lost on children.

Break it down: What shapes is it made of?
Asking what shape something is can be very simple, but asking what shapes something is made of can become very complex and can also be a great way to discover new words. For example, try asking a kid what shapes a teddy bear is made of. They’ll definitely start with the most simple (“Nose is triangle; foot is circle.”) but will soon rise to the challenge of breaking down more complicated portions (“Ear is BIG circle and little circle; tummy is loooooong circle.”). Here the teacher also learns what shapes the kids don’t know and can introduce words like oval or oblong.

Opposites & Abstract: What is it not?
A great way to encourage abstract thinking is to ask the students for the exact opposite of the information they have. Basically, instead of asking “What is it?” try asking “What is it not?”. This challenges them to rack their brain for relevant words and phrases rather than simply identifying what they see in front of them, and then decide whether those words apply to the situation. Further, it helps them practice more varied sentence structure other than “It is _____.” For example, if you’ve asked your students what the weather is, try asking them what the weather isn’t today. Rather than the repetitive “It is sunny,” you’ll be able to elicit a greater range of responses (It’s not rainy! It isn’t stormy. No tornado today!”).

Give these a try.  See how they work in your classroom!

-Ashley

TEFL TIPS #1 – The Almighty Flashcard (1)

A with chalk and number

A flashcard is to an ESL teacher is like the Batmobile to Batmanno ESL teacher I know would be without them!

I think the core of their popularity is largely due to the teacher/student language barriers inherent in ESL education, especially when working with beginners or younger students. A flashcard of an apple portrays an apple in any language: the word may be different but the meaning is understood. An apple in England isn’t a robot in China. That being said, a girl in Thailand sometimes isn’t what a girl would be elsewhere, but that’s not for now…

Flashcards can also be used for a variety of purposes: to introduce new vocabulary, for kinesthetic activities, speaking cues, auditory activities, and much more. What one can do with flashcards is potentially limitless, so what a great prop to start my mini-series, “TEFL Tips”, with…

#1

Activity – Where is the _____? – (Listening/ speaking)

Age – Pre-K, K, primary

Level – Beginner

This is an easy one. It’s great for teaching new vocabulary and children have loads of fun playing it. It’s basically like that game you see novice magicians do at kids’ parties using 3 cups and a pea.

You start by teaching three new flashcards (preferably of related objects). You then turn all 3 over and move them around. When you have stopped, ask the students, “Where is the ____?” The student whose turn it is, then has to say the name of the flashcard he/she has turned over. If he/she has picked the wrong card, then they continue until they select the correct one.

As the game progresses you can start by asking the students if they want you to move the flashcards faster or slower. This normally encourages them to speak, and you are bombarded by screams of, “Teacher, me really really fast!”

So, in addition to learning the vocabularies on the flashcards, the students are using English in a more natural setting and communicating with you.

Just like the Daleks keep popping up throughout series’ of Doctor Who, I’m sure I’ll write many more tips for flashcard use in the future.

Thank you for checking this out!

-Liam

Learning Korean (Hangul)

hangul 2

Being born and raised in Wales, different languages have always been present in my day to day life. That sounds a lot more exotic than it actually is; everyone in Wales is required to study Welsh until he/she finishes school, so basically, I always had that in addition to the standard French and German lessons most people have at school. And then,  not to mention the millions of pounds the government spends on road signs in both Welsh and English that can be seen throughout the country (the second most common thing in Wales, with sheep being the first).

_62457276_roadsignadelemallows

However, it wasn’t until I moved to Thailand where I started to really enjoy learning a language that I thought about seriously trying to becoming fluent in one. I could understand these weird tonal noises (Thai)- ‘How incredible is that?’ I thought.

However, that said, I still am not fluent in any language apart from English (and many may question that). So now, a few weeks before I head to South Korea, I have thrown myself into learning Korean, like a 25-year-old virgin throws himself into a brothel. More specifically I have started learning their alphabet: Hangul. I am determined to study these alien symbols and learn to construct sentences using them. I am studying using the following book, which you can buy from Amazon:

hangul

I have already mastered using a few vowels and consonants, and I just learned my first word:

 한글

(Hangul)

Ill keep you updated on how it goes.

-Liam

All photos were sourced from Google images and Amazon.