Teaching on the road

I’t’s been about 18 months since I made the transition from teaching English in classrooms around the world to teaching English online from airbnb’s around the world.

It has granted me a freedom that I could of only dreamed of a few years ago.

I’ve thoroughly enjoyed making different cities my home for a few weeks. I prefer taking the time to explore slowly and not rushing my experiences. From Budapest to Marrakesh, from Bangkok to London, I’ve been lucky enough to travel to multiple parts of the globe.

How? All because I make money from my mobile phone.

But, the lifestyle isn’t all travelling and late starts. It’s hard work that requires planning and discipline.

However, in my opinion, the rewards are well worth it.

If you’re willing to put in the hard work, teaching online doesn’t only provide you with a flexible schedule, but it can help you achieve a healthy bank balance.

I’m going to cover travel and teaching online topics such as: portable classrooms, internet backups , devices and much more in future posts. But for now, I want to help you to get on your own way.

So, firstly, you’ll need a job!

Online education is on the rise. There is no shortage of online companies to choose from. Do your research and find out which one is best for you!

I work for Palfish and I LOVE IT!

Palfish

There are many reasons why working for Palfish is great. Good pay, flexible bookings and a social network of teachers and mentors are just a few.

I’ve helped several teachers get started on Palfish. If you’d like to join the team, download the Palfish app and insert my invitation code – 45012005.

Alternatively, you can drop me a message and I can answer any questions you have.

Palfish only hires native English speakers with a degree. There is no leeway.

Airbnb

When you teach and travel, it is important to ensure you have a quiet space and some privacy.

I’ve found using airbnbs not only the cheapest option, but the least risky. You can message the host in advance to enquire about the wifi and ask any other questions that may effect your teaching experience.

Chances are you already have an airbnb account, but if you don’t, sign up here and help a brother out –

https://www.airbnb.com/c/lhaddock4?currency=GBP

If you have any questions about teaching online or teaching and travelling, please get in touch!

Have a fantastic day!

Late to the airbnb party..

Established in 2008, Airbnb has been around for a fair amount of time. However, it wasn’t until mid-2015 that I first used it.

It was a brilliant choice!

To anyone that doesn’t know what Airbnb is, it is a service that allows people to list and rent a huge range of properties all over the world. Accommodation can range from a tent on a rooftop to a Buddhist temple, slick apartments to high-end villas.  The Airbnb website and app are easy to use and make searching simple. You can filter dates, prices, location and guest quantity. It also allows you to connect to Facebook, which saves the hassle of registering and can potentially get you discounts.

My first Airbnb experience was during the summer of 2015. I stayed with a Japanese man called Yuki in Osaka, Japan. His house was stereotypically Japanese and located in a residential area away from the swarms of tourists. He was a great host—he picked us up from the train station, provided us with food and beverages and offered loads of help. This experience made a great trip even better. It enabled me to have a more authentic experience by living like a local, with a local.

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Apart from a different style of accommodation, Airbnb can also be the cheapest way to sleep while you travel. Many Airbnb prices even beat the travellers’ all-time favorite—the hostel.

Since my first Airbnb experience only a few months ago, I always open my Airbnb app before the Hostelworld one when booking accommodation. That said, I can see that overusing Airbnb would make me crave the social atmosphere of hostels.

But for now, I love it, why didn’t I do it sooner?

-Liam