TEFL TIPS #6 – Increase your cash: Start Tutoring

So you’ve taken the leap and decided to teach abroad: you found a great job, set up your apartment, and found the means to keep yourself fed, washed, and comfortable. Like many TEFL teachers you’ll discover rent, food, and utilities always run a bit higher than you expected and you’re itching for some spending cash. If you truly enjoy teaching, private tutoring can be a fantastic way to supplement your income while gaining experience with a wider range of ages and ability levels. Tutoring jobs are generally easy to secure—a flyer on a telephone pole is often enough to get a few students, while in some areas you may be approached randomly on the street just for being a foreigner. However, it is essential to realize teaching and tutoring are very different things, so before you start filling up your schedule, keep in mind:

 Know the Purpose

Those seeking out tutors each have unique reasons and goals. Make sure you thoroughly understand what each student is looking for. A middle-aged family man planning to relocate abroad doesn’t need to know the difference between past progressive and past perfect tenses, nor will a high school student studying for college entrance exams be all that concerned with how to order food in a restaurant.

Take Advantage of the Flexibility 

Your first tutoring job will no doubt be challenging—a one-on-one session with no coursebook, no lesson plans, and no classroom is a daunting scenario. Your first session with a new student can certainly be used to get a better handle on their current ability level, but be prepared to provide your students with some sort of practice material or key phrases/vocabulary to practice. Don’t be afraid to assign homework or give short quizzes—they’re paying you to both support and challenge them. Use the freedom from structure to challenge yourself as well by testing your creativity—develop new activities or generate original material you can use in the future.

Know What You’re Worth

One of the most awkward things TEFL teachers need to learn to do is set their tutoring fee—having some idea of what to charge is important to know before you get caught off guard by the question. In countries like Korea where English education is a huge industry and cost of living is high, tutoring fees generally start around 40,000 Won / hour (roughly $33), while in countries like Cambodia where cost of living is lower and English is already widely spoken, one can expect to make only about $10 / hour. In other countries it can vary greatly from city to city and grade to grade—and payment doesn’t necessarily need to be in cash. In more rural areas I’ve been paid in honey, oranges, kale, and whiskey. One generous woman even paid me with a live chicken intended for dinner—I’d like to believe she’s still living a full life clucking around in the hills of Thailand.

Tutoring may not be for everyone, but it’s definitely an easy way to make ends meet in a pinch or gain some spending money for those long weekends.

-Ashley

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